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2017-18 Clover Park School District STEM Fair Information Packet
 
S
Science
T
Technology
E
Engineering
M
Mathematics
6th-8th Grade Student Information Packet.
The 2017-2018 CPSD STEM Fair offers three ways for students to participate. Schools may participate in one or more of the categories:
Individual
Competition
(Judged)
Team
Demonstration
(Judged)
Individual
Exhibition
(Not Judged)

Competition projects will be judged against grade band scoring rubrics.

These projects must be completed by students.

Students will compete in competitive Science and Engineering challenges. Students will be judged against a scoring rubric.

These projects will be completed at the fair in a given amount of time, in a competitive format.

Exhibition projects will not be judged.

These projects will be for display only.

Selection Process

Three students from each grade level (1st, 2nd, 3rd place) will be selected at your school fair to send on to the district fair. Students can work in teams of two. If the school does not have a science fair, a process must be in place to select students. Students MUST register through their building STEM Fair representative. Registration is due February 28, 2018.

Two team (no more than three students) per grade level will compete at the district STEM Fair.

Students will compete in a predetermined grade level class challenge provided by the stem fair. A grade level rubric will be provided with a list of materials. Building grade level winning group will compete at the district fair. Students MUST register ahead of time through their building STEM Fair representative. Registration is due February 28, 2018

Challenges:

Earth Quake Challenge
One Meter Egg Drop Challenge
Straw Rocket Challenge

Limit ten boards per school. Students MUST register ahead of time through their building STEM Fair representative.

Registration is due

February 28, 2018.

INDIVIDUAL COMPETITION (JUDGED) AND INDIVIDUAL EXHIBITION (NOT JUDGE)
Science Projects Engineering Projects

Asking and Answering Questions

Defining and Solving Problems

Scientific projects follow the science practices where students ask questions about what would happen if a variable is changed. Students do not bring their science experiments to the fair. Only the display boards are allowed.

Engineering projects follow the engineering practices where students define a simple design problem that can be solved through the development of an object, tool or process and includes several criteria for success and constraints on material, time, and cost. Students can identify a need or problem to be solved and design a solution that could take the form of a drawing, a model or prototype, or writing or using a program. The prototype or picture of prototype must be present. The solution needs to be part of the student’s display at the fair.

Tips for Selecting a Topic

Choosing a topic is one of the most difficult things about doing a STEM fair project. Keep in mind as you are picking a topic that you will have to work on it throughout the entire process. Once you choose an idea that you like, spend some time thinking about how the whole project would work. If you can imagine obstacles that will be too difficult, then find a new topic.

Don’t forget the cost of supplies and time constraints. Here are a few things to keep in mind

when selecting a topic: 

  • Choose something you are interested in 
  • Think of something you already know something about 
  • Think about types of materials you already have at your home 
  • Think about questions you have about the world around you 
  • Think about problems you encounter in your everyday life 
  • Think of ways you could make something better by improving its design

Your teacher will provide guidance and resources to get you started with your STEM project. 

There are many resources in the library and on the internet that can help you choose a STEM topic. For a science project be sure to choose something that is testable, repeatable, and measurable. For an engineering project define a simple design problem that can be solved through the development of an object, tool, process, or system and includes several criteria for success and constraints on materials, time, or cost.

NOTE: In accordance with the South Sound Regional Science Fair and the Intel

International Science Fair Criteria… 

  • All students must refrain from doing experiments which may be hazardous to themselves, others, or animals. 
  • No bacterial growth projects will be allowed. 
  • Experiments should be supervised by an adult.

IMPORTANT NOTE: Student who wishes to participate in the South Sound Regional Science and Engineering Fair at PLU will need to follow the PLU and ISEF Rules and Guidelines. 

This information can be located online at https://www.plu.edu/scifair/2017-registration/grades-6-8/

SCIENCE PRACTICES DISPLAY BOARD GUIDELINES

All projects need to be displayed on a presentation board (standard size 48" by 36").

Title of Report

Section #1

Question/Problem

Section #2

Prediction/Hypothesis

Section #3

Variables

Section #4

Procedures/Materials/Safety Concerns

 

 

 

 

 

 

Section #5

Data/Pictures/Analysis

Section #6

Conclusion

(Side #1) (Middle Section) (Side #2)

Science Practices projects follow the grade level appropriate Science and Engineering Practices. 

See the table on the next page for the step-by-step description of the Science and Engineering Practices and what students need to show for each part. 

  • The project must have a title, and each section must be labeled as shown in the diagram above. The spacing demonstrated here is only a suggestion. The size of each section may vary.
  • Student’s name, teacher’s name, grade level, date, and school name must be located on back of board.

For safety purposes, no items or parts of your experiment are allowed in front of your board on the day of the fair. 

NOTE: 

The sections of the board are numbered for clarity only and do not mandate a sequence for completion.

SCIENCE PRACTICES DISPLAY BOARD GUIDELINES

NOTE:The sections of the board are numbered for clarity only and do not mandate a sequence for completion.

Sections

What Goes in Each Section

 Section #1: Question/Problem

What is the Question or Problem Statement?

What are you trying to find out or answer with your project? What is the reason for doing the experiment?

 This first section of the display board only needs to be one sentence long, but- it must be in the form of a question.

Ex. What is the effect of the MV on the RV?

TIPS: Make sure the Question is only testing one thing. For example, the question “How does the amount of light affect the growth of corn plants?” can be answered in a scientific experiment. Ex. How does the MV affect the RV?

 Section #2: Prediction/Hypothesis

What is the Prediction or Hypothesis?

The prediction/hypothesis is what you think will happen when you do the experiment and should be written in a cause and effect statement. Labeled variables can be included in your hypothesis. The hypothesis is normally one sentence long.

In this section you state what you think the answer to the problem statement will be based on what you learned in the research.

The sentence should be an “If, then, because” statement like below:

IF (the manipulated variable) IS (increased, decreased or stays the same (circle one)), THEN (the responding variable) WILL (increase, decrease or stay the same (circle one)), BECAUSE (give a reason for your prediction).

When I change the RV the MV will (increase, decrease or stay the same) because

TIP: Make sure that your hypothesis only predicts one outcome. Then, you will clearly know whether your hypothesis is right or not.

Section #3: Variables

What are Variables?

Variables are changed or changing factors used to test a hypothesis or prediction and may affect the results of the experiment. List all the variables in your experiment.

This section must have three types of variables listed:

1.    The Manipulated Variable: the variable that is changed during the experiment.

2.    The Responding Variable: the variable that is being measured. It is the response to the manipulated variable.

3.    The Controlled Variables: the variables that are kept the same for the entire experiment.

TIPS: Sample: Manipulated Variable: type of liquid given to plants; Responding Variable: amount that each plant has grown in centimeters; Controlled Variables: sunlight, temperature, location of plants, amount of liquid

Section #4: Materials/ Procedures/ Safety Concerns

What are these? Plan your investigation and list all materials, supplies, equipment, tools, etc. you used. Include a step-by step procedure. These can be changed and/or added to after you have run experiment to make procedures clear and detailed. Also include any safety concerns.

This section must include:

1.     A list of all materials needed to conduct the experiment in a bulleted list.

2.     A numbered step-by-step set of procedures that will be followed to conduct the experiment.

3.     A list of all safety concerns surrounding this experiment is recorded in your

journal.

TIPS: Make sure the procedures are detailed enough so anyone could gather the materials from the list, follow the procedure, and get the same results. Also, there are always safety concerns when conducting experiments. Make sure to include these in your science journal.

Section #5: Data/Analysis

What is Data/Analysis?

This is the section where you record what actually happened during the experiment.

The data collected from the experiment is recorded in a data table and is graphed to visually display the data.

This section may include:

  • A few paragraphs that explains what happened during the experiment. Use data from your experiment in your explanation. A data table and a graph also need to be included.
  • Labeled pictures/photographs, drawings, or sketches of your experiments as it happened.
  • A data table that organizes the data.
    • Label each data table with a title.
    • Each column should have a heading with units if appropriate.
    • 3 or more trials for each group should be shown.
    • The average for the 3 or more trials in each group should be calculated.
  • A graph that visually displays the data.
    • Use graph paper or a computer.
    • Decide whether a line graph or a bar graph is better for your data.
    • Label the top of the graph with a title that includes the responding/dependent variable first, manipulated/independent variable second, and units of measurement
    • Label the x-axis with the manipulated/independent variable and its units.
    • Label the y-axis with the responding/dependent variable and its units.
    • Number the axis appropriately & Label the individual bars appropriately.
    • Make sure that the graph is colorful and can easily be understood. It should paint a clear visual picture of exactly what happened.

Section #6: Conclusion

What is the Conclusion?

 

The conclusion is where you decide to accept or reject your hypothesis, and explain what you have learned. Use data from your experiment.

This section must include two parts:

  1. Restate your hypothesis and tell if your hypothesis was correct or incorrect.

    If your hypothesis was incorrect, discuss what might have caused it to be so. Explain all of your data/results including the average(s) and range(s) when possible.

  2. Write a few paragraphs to explain what you have learned, how other people can learn from your experiment, and how others can put your results to work in real situations. Include how the experiment might be improved upon.

ENGINEERING PRACTICES DISPLAY BOARD GUIDELINES

All projects need to be displayed on a presentation board (standard size 48" by 36")

Title of Report

Section #1

Asking Questions and Defining Problems

Section #2

Develop Possible Solutions to a Problem

Section #3

Plan and Carry out Investigations

Section #4

Constructing Explanations to Optimize the Design Solution

 

 

 

 

 

Section #5

Optimizing the Design Solution

Section #6

Conclusion

(Side #1) (Middle Section) (Side #2)

Engineering Practices projects follow each step of the grade level appropriate Science and Engineering practices. 

See the table on the next page for the step-by-step description of the engineering design process and what students need to do for each part.

  • The project must have a title, and each section must be labeled as shown in the diagram above. The spacing demonstrated here is only a suggestion. The size of each section may vary.
  • Student’s name, teacher’s name, grade level, date, school name must be located on back of board.
  • Prototype & second model are present with presentation board ONLY if they fit in 12 x 24 in space
  • Do not use product brand names; use brand “x” and “y”.
ENGINEERING PRACTICES DISPLAY BOARD GUIDELINES CONTINUED

NOTE:The sections of the board are numbered for clarity only and do not mandate a sequence for completion.

Sections

What Must be Included in Each Section

Section #1:

Asking questions and defining problems.

Defining a design problem that can be solved through the development of an object, tool, process, or system that includes multiple criteria and constraints, including scientific knowledge that may limit possible solutions.

  1. Define the design problem
  2. Define the criteria
  3. Define the constraints

Section #2:

Developing Possible Solutions to a Problem. 

Perform research on a problem before beginning a design to a solution. Talk with peers to generate and share possible solutions to a problem. Possible solutions are limited by available materials and resources (constraints). This is a two stage process of evaluating different ideas that have been proposed by using a systematic method, such as a trade-off matrix, to determine which solutions are the most promising, and by testing different solutions and then combining the best ideas into a new solution that may be better than any of the preliminary ideas. The success of a designed solution is determined by considering the desired features of a solution (criteria).

  1. Show your research.
  2. Show how you collaborate with othe
  3. Explore alternative ideas.
  4. Evaluate competing design solutions using a systematic proce
  5. Determine how well each solution meets the criteria and constraints of the problem.
  6. Identify one solution.

Section #3:

Planning and carrying out investigations. 

Develop a model or prototype to generate data to test ideas about designed systems, including those representing inputs and outputs. Plan and conduct an investigation collaboratively to produce data to serve as the basis for evidence, using fair tests in which variables are controlled and failure points are considered to identify aspects of the model or prototype that can be improved. The number of trials needs to be considered and all safety issues need to be addressed.

  1. A prototype needs to be built that matches criteria and constraints above.
  2. The prototype needs to be tested in multiple conditions/trial
  3. Safety issues need to be addressed.
  4. Tests are designed to identify failure points or difficulties, which suggest the elements of a design that need to be improved.
  5. Prototype data goes here.

Section #4:

Constructing explanations to optimize the Design Solution 

A solution needs to be tested and then modified on the basis of the test results in order to improve it. Improve upon your prototype by building and testing new models. Use a systematic approach for evaluating solutions with respect to how well they meet the criteria and constraints of a problem. Use quantitative analysis (data) to your investigation and distinguish between correlation and causation using basic statistical techniques of data and error analysis. Analyze data from tests to determine similarities and differences among several designs to identify the best characteristics of each that can be combined into a new solution to better meet the criteria of success

  1. Use the data from your prototype and create a new model.
  2. What data did you use to create a new model and why?
  3. Test your new model and collect dat
  4. Analyze and interpret data to determine similarities and differences in findin
  5. Generate multiple solutions to the problem based on how well they met the criteria and constraints of the design problem
  6. New model data goes here.

Section #5:

Optimize the design solution. 

The summary data that compares your prototype data to your new models you collected goes in this section. Identify the characteristics of the design that performed the best in each test.

  1. Use the data from your prototype and create a new model.
  2. What data did you use to create a new model and why?
  3. Test your new model and collect dat
  4. Analyze and interpret data to determine similarities and differences in findin
  5. Generate multiple solutions to the problem based on how well they met the criteria and constraints of the design problem
  6. New model data goes here.

Section #6: Conclusion 

What was your optimal design and why? Construct a convincing argument that supports or refutes claims for either explanations or solutions about your model. What were your successes and failures?

  1. What was your final solution to the problem and why?
  2. What data do you have to support your conclusion?
  3. How is your solution useful?
  4. What would you have done different and why?
  5. If you were going to continue this project, what new questions would you ask?

Individual Competition Project - Judged

Judging Components: Projects are evaluated on three components: the

presentation board, the oral presentation, and the journal. Award decisions will be based on the following: 

  1. The Scientific or Engineering Process Presentation Board:
  • Does the project promote analytical thinking (grade level appropriate)?
  • Is the project centered around a testable original idea (science practices) OR is the project centered around a simple idea or problem to be solved (engineering practices)?
  • Does it demonstrate creativity?
  • Is the student’s growth and learning evident?
  • Does the presentation board contain all sections?
  • Is the board neat and legible?
  • Did you include you prototype and model for the engineering process?
  • Include pictures of you doing science or engineering. 
  1. The Oral Process:
  • Can the student verbally explain all aspects of their project?
  • Is the student’s growth and learning evident?
  • Can the student answer questions about their project? 
  1. The Journal:
  • Handwritten with dates – (Work that has been typed and dated can be taped into your journal.)
  • Does it include all the students’ original thoughts, ideas, and data?
  • A completed journal must be submitted with your science fair project in order to be considered for an award.

IMPORTANT NOTE: Any student who wishes to participate in the South Sound Regional Science and Engineering Fair at PLU will need to follow the PLU and ISEF Rules and Guidelines. 

This information can be located online at https://www.plu.edu/scifair/2017- registration/grades-6-8/

Team Demonstration - Judged

One team for each challenge will compete. The team may be from different grade levels. A team may consist of 2-3 students. Teams are selected by their school and need to be registered ahead of time. Students will compete in competitive Science and Engineering challenges. The challenges are timed and could take from 5 - 30 minutes. Students can practice the demonstration challenge ahead of time and may be required to bring their challenge to the event. Students will be scored against a rubric and timed. Rubrics will be available ahead of time for students to practice.

Challenges:

Earth Quake Challenge

One Meter Egg Drop Challenge

Straw Rocket Challenge

Individual Exhibition - Not Judged

  1. The Science or Engineering Presentation Board: All exhibition projects must be the work of the student(s); however, parents may assist students with certain aspects of the project. Parental assistance may include the following: 
  • Helping to establish the idea of the project
  • Helping gather materials
  • Helping guide students through the science/ engineering design process
  • Helping answer questions
  • Helping student with correct spelling and grammar for display board 
  1. The Oral Process: Journals need to be present. Your journal should include all your rough drafts used to create your final STEM fair display board. It should have your data, notes, questions, and research. Be sure to date your entries. 
  2. The Journal: There is no formal oral presentation in the exhibition category. Students are encouraged to share what they have learned through the completion of their STEM Fair projects with those visiting the exhibition, but are not required to be present with their display.